Oneupweb: YouTube View Count Algorithm

If you compare 28,439 likes vs. 853 dislikes, what result do you think would be the reporting YouTube view count? Common sense would predict that the view count would more than likely have it at least over 28,439 views, right? Wrong. Not even close. Try 303.

Notice it says 303 views but notice the Likes

Yes, you read that correctly. Three hundred and three views reported. Doesn’t sound like something possible from an online video giant like YouTube, but this is a common occurrence for videos that hit the 300 view threshold too fast.

Regardless of the frozen view count at 303 for DJ Earworm’s mashup for the top pop hits of 2011 the true count as of December 27th, 2011, was well over 28,439 views yet for several days it stayed reporting at 303 views. It wasn’t until today that YouTube finally joined real time and it is now reporting to be at 2,550,406 views. But the buzz it created in being frozen was most entertaining.

One viewer of the video commented that one possibility could be”… view count gets stuck when too many people are watching simultaneously.” (@getbanned123)

A few other viewers had some interesting comments to share on the view count as well:

What exactly is the algorithm for the YouTube view count?

YouTube View Count Algorithm: as explained by YouTube.

“YouTube employs proprietary technology to prevent the artificial inflation of a video’s viewcount by spam bots, malware and other means. We validate views to ensure the accuracy of the viewcount of all videos beginning with the first view. This validation process becomes publicly visible when the viewcount reaches 300. At this point, the viewcount may slow or temporarily freeze until we have time to verify that all further views are legitimate. Rest assured that the views system is working as intended, and that the viewcount will update as soon as the system has verified the legitimacy of the views.”

For such a video giant and popular website you would think they would have come up with an algorithm to report view counts in real time though.

"Scooby Doo - you know we have a mystery to solve!" -- FROZEN

Sometimes these frozen counts can last from 24 hours to, in some reported cases, a year. Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate their validation process. It is great to know they take their site that serious in preventing abusive activities. But in the same token with the way some of these platforms these days are employing real time algorithm’s YouTube should solve this one a little more in real time as well.

Watching the reaction to the view count mishap yesterday with DJ Earworm’s mashup video was most entertaining, but at least now they are caught up and the world can enjoy the 2011 mashup while knowing the world really is watching in real time. Or at least we think?

But now, with no further ado, we end this social share with none other than DJ Earworm’s Mashup video “United State of Pop 2011 (World Go Boom)”. Happy New Year and here comes 2012!

How about you? What is your take on the YouTube view count algorithm?