Trust Me – I Cuss

It’s true, I do.

Thinking back, I can’t necessarily associate this form of expression to over exposure from my parents. Sure, the occasional “dammit!” or “shit!” rang through the household once in a great while but really, I think it may have come from my past experiences. At least that’s what I’m going with.

OUWBlog-PercivedTrustworthynessGraphic

My past is pretty varied. But if I break it down there seems to be a theme here.

  • I’ve been an avid athlete throughout my life and particularly my school years – softball, tennis, volleyball and other team sports.
  • In my early 20’s, I was a sheriff’s deputy and forensic photographer serving with the undercover and detective units during drug busts and on crime scene investigations.
  • In my late 20’s and 30’s I lived in Alaska and was a competitive dog musher running 200-400 mile races with a team of 16 dogs.
  • Late 30’s to today, I’ve been the owner of a digital marketing agency with a team of nearly 50, 20 and 30 something’s.

So, how does my past have anything to do with cussing? Really? To me, it feels pretty obvious but I’ve lived it. I guess I would describe it as – adrenaline, camaraderie, excitement. I compete.  Not to the point of “I’ll do anything to anyone just to win”. Mostly I’m just the type of person that doesn’t give up easy, feel there’s a solution to every problem and will fight to find it. I want to win against adversity and challenges. I get fired up, have passion and try very hard to instill that in my team and my clients. Wait for it… and sometimes – conveying that passion, inspiring others and fighting those challenges is better communicated with a swear word – or three. And it’s all about inflection.

Because of my mid-western upbringing and past experiences, my personality has developed in a down-to-earth, open, no-holds-barred, tell-it-like-it-is sort of way. I start off wanting to trust someone and convey that they can trust me. Integrity is crucial to me so when I passionately explain a problem or solution, it’s important my audience feel at least a fraction of what I feel. From there, they can empathize and become emotionally invested which, more often than not, leads to trust.

But there’s more to it. Most people cuss, and there’s a psychology surrounding it. The timing and audience always need to be considered however, when you cuss you level the playing field. You become more relatable and trustworthy to the person you’re talking with. To further support my position and justify my occasional potty mouth, here are a couple of key points from Psychiatrist Dr. Neel Burton:

Peer and social bonding: Swearing can serve to show that we belong in a certain group, or that we are able to be ourselves and so wholly comfortable with the members of that group. If done correctly, it can also signal that we are open, honest, self-deprecating, easygoing, and barrel loads of fun.

Self-Expression: Swearing can be a way of showing that we really mean something or that it is really important to us, that’s why swearing is so much a part of any sport. It also broadens our register and makes us more lively and interesting, being used for example, to add emphasis or ‘punch’ to our speech.

So there you have it.

Trust is vital when you place your faith in another individual – in business and in life. If doing business with a partner you can trust is high on your list, give me a call. You can certainly trust me – I’ll prove it.

Lisa Wehr

https://www.oneupweb.com

Trust Me, I Cuss: The Psychology of Swearing from Oneupweb